Undergraduate Courses

Mennonite Studies at University of Winnipeg, 2013-2014

MAJOR IN MENNONITE STUDIES

Enrich your life and major in Mennonite Studies

STUDY THE RICH HISTORY OF GLOBAL MENNONITES

Courses: Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Roy Loewen

Royden Loewen, Ph.D.
Chair in Mennonite Studies
Professor of History and Mennonite Studies

Winter Semester 2014

  • Mennonite Studies II: From Russia to North America and Around the World
    MENN-2102/HIST-2109
    Tuesday/Thursday, 10:00-11:15
  • Mennonites in Canada: From 1789-Present
    MENN-3541-001
    Tuesday/Thursday, 2:30 - 3:45
Dr. Hans Werner

Hans Werner, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History and Mennonite Studies

Fall Semester 2013

  • Introduction to Low German
    MENN-2107-050/GERM-2107
    Monday, 6:00-9:00
  • Mennonite Studies I: Interpreting the Radical Reformation
    MENN-2101/HIST-2108
    Tuesday/Thursday, 10:00 – 11:15

See an outline for a Major in Mennonite Studies here.

Click on the courses listed below for more info. Students are advised to consult the appropriate timetable available from the Records Office for courses offered during the current term.

MENN/HIST-1010/6 MENNONITES AND THE MODERN WORLD (Le3)
This course is a history of the ethnic identity and religious faith of the Mennonites from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will interpret the writings of the Mennonites, including their letters, memoirs, and diaries. These sources will show how Mennonites related to such modern phenomena as Protestantism, nationalism, capitalism, feminism, and global culture. The course will trace the Mennonites as they migrated from Europe to North America and as they established themselves in Asia, South America, and Africa.
MENN-2009/3 MENNONITES IN GLOBAL CONTEXT (Le3)
This course examines present-day Mennonites around the world. The diversification of Mennonite faith and practice by factors such as emigration, missionary activity, and social assimilation will be discussed. Special attention is given to the implications of this diversity for the development of Mennonite identity and mission.
MENN-2101/3 MENNONITE STUDIES I (Le3)
This course is a survey of the origins and history of the Anabaptists in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, Prussia and Russia. Attention will be given to the interaction of religion and culture in the history of European Mennonites.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2108/3, and accepted for credit by Religious Studies.
MENN-2102/3 MENNONITE STUDIES II (Le3)
This course is a survey of the immigration and resettlement of Mennonites in Russia and in North and South America. The course will include a study of the origins and distinctive characteristics of particular Mennonite groups and conclude with a brief survey of Mennonites around the world.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2109/3, and accepted for credit by Religious Studies.
MENN-2131/3 HISTORY OF PEACE AND NONVIOLENCE (Le3)
This course examines the history of pacifism, peace movements, and nonviolent solutions offered during specific times of conflicts. The scope of this course is global. Thus, the course contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence with those of Hindu and Buddhist traditions. The major focus on the course is on the religious and secular visions of preserving peace in North America. For case studies, the course esamines Mennonite communities that historically have embraced pacifism as a fundamental principle of social organization.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2131/3.
MENN-2322/3 ORIGINS AND CHARACTER OF ANABAPTISM (Le3)
This course will introduce students to the beginnings of Anabaptism in sixteenth-century Europe in the context of the Reformation and Renaissance movements. It will explore the distinctive vision and understanding of the Christian way which characterized the early Anabaptists and seek to relate this to the development of Christian identity and mission in the contemporary world.
MENN-3000/6 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MENNONITE STUDIES (NT)
This tutorial is designed to enable students to follow an aspect of Mennonite Studies in depth. The topic should be selected in consultation with the Professor. Offered on an individual basis to advanced students at the discretion of the Chair in Mennonite Studies.
MENN-3102/3 LUTHER, ZWINGLI AND RADICAL REFORMERS (Le3)
This course deals with the relationship between the objectives and methods of the "mainline" reformers of the sixteenth century (mainly Luther and Zwingli) and those of the "radical" reformers (such as Thomas Müntzer, Andrew Carlstadt, and the Anabaptists), and assesses the historical results of this relationship.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3216/3.
MENN-3108/3 GENDER AND MENNONITES (Le3)
This course will examine the role of women and of men in the evolving Mennonite society. It will trace these gender roles amongst the Radical Anabaptists of Western Europe, the agrarian Mennonite communities in Russia and North America, and the modern, urban centres in North America. The course will examine patriarchal structures of Mennonite households, churches, and communities, but also focus on the ways in which women create mechanisms of autonomy and meaning within those structures. The ideas that comprise Mennonite femininity and masculinity will receive special attention. Gender will also be traced through the Mennonite life-cycle, commencing at childhood and tracked through times of youth, marriage, mid-age and retirement. The course will examine how Mennonite theological teachings, everyday language, modes of production, fertility rates, and national cultures affect ideas of gender in Mennonite society.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3108/3.
MENN-3110/3 RUSSIA AND THE MENNONITES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course deals with the history of the Mennonites in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union from 1789 to 1989. Cultural, economic, and religious developments of the so-called ‘Mennonite Commonwealth’ in the nineteenth century and of the far-flung Mennonite communities in the Soviet Union during the twentieth century are emphasized and analyzed.
RESTRICTIONS: May not be taken by students with credit in the former MENN-3203.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3110/3.
MENN-3111/3 CONFLICT AND MENNONITES (Le3)
Thiscourse deals with the Anabaptist and Mennonite understanding and experience of pacifism throughout the centuries, with special emphasis on their dealings with nation-states, church schism, ethnic relations, and domestic abuse.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for both this course and the former MENN-2103/3.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3111/3.
MENN-3114/3 LATIN AMERICA AND THE MENNONITES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course is a study of the founding and development of Mennonite communities in Central and South America. The focus is on problems European and Canadian Mennonites faced (and still face) in their attempt to establish an existence and identity in a predominantly Latin world. The course contrasts these conservative Mennonites to the more radical communities composed of indigenous Latin American Mennonites. In particular, it compares the manner in which the two groups of Mennonites have responded to the social and economic issues of Latin America.
RESTRICTIONS: May not be taken by students with credit in the former MENN-3101.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3114/3.
MENN-3116/3 MENNONITES AND WORLD ISSUES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course studies Mennonite responses to the wider world, and examines changes that have taken place among Mennonites with regard to world issues over the course of history. These issues include: urbanization, environmentalism, poverty, mass culture, the communications revolution, the global economy and family life. An emphasis is placed on the Twentieth Century World.
RESTRICTIONS: Students with standing in MENN-3301/3 or HIST-3301/3 may not receive credit for MENN-3116/3 or HIST-3116/3.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3116/3.
MENN-3150/3 MENNONITE COMMUNITY AND DEVELOPMENT (S3)
This course analyzes the experiences of the Mennonite community in service and peace work. It highlights the values, approach, and methods particular to Mennonite humanitarian work. The Mennonite tradition of holistic development emphasizes individual transformation (providing the tools for indigenous development) and social transformation (involving all peoples in creating local, national, and global systems that are just). The work of Mennonite organizations such as the Mennonite Central Committee and the Mennonite Economic Development Agency, of ecumenical organizations such as the Canadian Foodgrain Bank and InterChurch Action, and of inter-organizational groups such as SEED Winnipeg will provide examples for student reflection and analysis.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100/6 or the permission of instructor.
CROSS-LISTED: International Development Studies IDS-3150/3.
MENN-3201/3 MENNONITE AUTHORS (Le3)
This course introduces the student to the works of Mennonite authors who either write in English or whose writings are available in English translation. Works of the following authors, among others, will be studied: Hans Harder, Arnold Dyck, Fritz Senn, Rudy Wiebe, and contemporary Mennonite poets.
MENN-3202/3 THE MENNONITE IMAGE IN WORLD LITERATURE (Le3)
This course deals with selected German and non-German authors who have treated the Mennonites as a major theme in their fiction. The following authors, among others, will be studied: H.J.C. von Grimmelshausen, Gottfried Keller, Theodor Fontane, Cæsar von Arx, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, and Sandra Birdsell.
MENN-3452/3 ANABAPTISM AND EVANGELICALISM (Le3)
This course will seek to understand both Evangelicalism and Anabaptism in light of recent historiography. Considerable attention will be given to the development of fundamentalism and evangelicalism in the past century in order to provide a basis for understanding the distinctive and common elements of the two traditions.
MENN-3541/3 MENNONITES IN CANADA (Le3)
This course will survey major developments in Canadian Mennonite communities from 1786 to the present. It will trace the following themes: the Swiss American and Russian roots of Canadian Mennonites; community formation in Ontario and Western Canada; Anabaptism in everyday life (especially the way it was played out in the family); theological developments in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the survival of Mennonite faith distinctives in the urban and socially-integrated Canadian society since World War II. Special emphasis will be placed on establishing the unique features of Canadian Mennonite experience.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3541/3.
MENN-4535/6 IMMIGRATION AND ETHNICITY IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES (S3)
This research seminar examines the history of immigration to North America between 1860 and 1960. The course focuses on the nature of migration patterns and the adaptation of immigrants to the new world, especially the rise of ethnic identities. The course discusses the similarities and differences in the Canadian and American immigrant experience.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-4535/6.