Undergraduate Courses

Mennonite Studies at University of Winnipeg, 2019-2020

CONSIDER A MAJOR IN MENNONITE STUDIES

Enrich your life and major in Mennonite Studies

STUDY THE RICH HISTORY OF GLOBAL MENNONITES

Courses: Fall/Winter 2019-2020

Roy Loewen

Royden Loewen, Ph.D.
Chair in Mennonite Studies
Professor of History and Mennonite Studies
Director Centre for Transnational Mennonite Studies

Fall Semester, 2019

  • MENN 2101(3)- Mennonite Studies I

Winter Semester, 2020

  • MENN 3116(3)
Aileen Friesen

Aileen Friesen, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History and Mennonite Studies
Executive Director, Plett Foundation
Co-director of Centre for Transnational Mennonite Studies

Fall Semester

  • MENN-3111(3) Conflict and Mennonites

Winter Semester

  • MENN-2102(3) Mennonite Studies II

See a possible outline for a Major in Mennonite Studies here.

Students are advised to consult the appropriate timetable available from the Records Office for courses offered during the current term.

MENN-2101/3 MENNONITE STUDIES I (Le3)
This course is a survey of the origins and history of the Anabaptists in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, Prussia and Russia. Attention will be given to the interaction of religion and culture in the history of European Mennonites.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2108/3, and accepted for credit by Religious Studies.
MENN-2102/3 MENNONITE STUDIES II (Le3)
This course is a survey of the immigration and resettlement of Mennonites in Russia and in North and South America. The course will include a study of the origins and distinctive characteristics of particular Mennonite groups and conclude with a brief survey of Mennonites around the world.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2109/3, and accepted for credit by Religious Studies.
MENN-2131/3 HISTORY OF PEACE AND NONVIOLENCE (Le3)
This course examines the history of pacifism, peace movements, and nonviolence in Europe and its neighboring continents. It focuses in particular on Europe, with special emphasis on the period from ancient Greece and Rome, to the time of the Enlightenment in France and England. To a lesser extent the course also addresses history of peace in Asia. Thus, the course contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence with those of Hindu, Buddhist and other eastern traditions.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-2131/3.
MENN-2132/3 HISTORY OF PEACE AND NONVIOLENCE II (Le3)
This course examines the history of peace from the mid 1770s till the present. It focuses in particular on events in North America, but examines events also in Europe and Asia. It examines the history of pacifism, peace movements, and nonviolent solutions offered during times of conflict. Both the ideology underlying this nonviolent, or counter-violent culture, and specific acts taken to resolve local, national and international conflicts are studied. The course notes Aboriginal and secular peace traditions, but focuses in particular on the history of peace and nonviolence in the Western Judeo-Christian traditions and particularly as experienced in Canada and the United States. Attention is given to peacemakers, leading men and women who articulated visions of peace during times of war and who openly criticized such concepts as “Redemptive Violence.” The course uses case studies of specific communities in North America that have embraced pacifism as a fundamental principle of social organization; these include the so-called Anabaptist groups, the Mennonites, Amish and Hutterites.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST:2132/3.
MENN-3000/6 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MENNONITE STUDIES (NT)
This tutorial is designed to enable students to follow an aspect of Mennonite Studies in depth. The topic should be selected in consultation with the Professor. Offered on an individual basis to advanced students at the discretion of the Chair in Mennonite Studies.
MENN-3108/3 GENDER AND MENNONITES (Le3)
This course will examine the role of women and of men in the evolving Mennonite society. It will trace these gender roles amongst the Radical Anabaptists of Western Europe, the agrarian Mennonite communities in Russia and North America, and the modern, urban centres in North America. The course will examine patriarchal structures of Mennonite households, churches, and communities, but also focus on the ways in which women create mechanisms of autonomy and meaning within those structures. The ideas that comprise Mennonite femininity and masculinity will receive special attention. Gender will also be traced through the Mennonite life-cycle, commencing at childhood and tracked through times of youth, marriage, mid-age and retirement. The course will examine how Mennonite theological teachings, everyday language, modes of production, fertility rates, and national cultures affect ideas of gender in Mennonite society.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3108/3.
MENN-3110/3 RUSSIA AND THE MENNONITES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course deals with the history of the Mennonites in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union from 1789 to 1989. Cultural, economic, and religious developments of the so-called ‘Mennonite Commonwealth’ in the nineteenth century and of the far-flung Mennonite communities in the Soviet Union during the twentieth century are emphasized and analyzed.
RESTRICTIONS: May not be taken by students with credit in the former MENN-3203.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3110/3.
MENN-3111/3 CONFLICT AND MENNONITES (Le3)
This course deals with the Anabaptist and Mennonite understanding and experience of pacifism throughout the centuries, with special emphasis on their dealings with nation-states, church schism, ethnic relations, and domestic abuse.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for both this course and the former MENN-2103/3.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3111/3.
MENN-3114/3 LATIN AMERICA AND THE MENNONITES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course is a study of the founding and development of Mennonite communities in Central and South America. The focus is on problems European and Canadian Mennonites faced (and still face) in their attempt to establish an existence and identity in a predominantly Latin world. The course contrasts these conservative Mennonites to the more radical communities composed of indigenous Latin American Mennonites. In particular, it compares the manner in which the two groups of Mennonites have responded to the social and economic issues of Latin America.
RESTRICTIONS: May not be taken by students with credit in the former MENN-3101.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3114/3.
MENN-3116/3 MENNONITES AND WORLD ISSUES (Le,S3)
This lecture/seminar course studies Mennonite responses to the wider world, and examines changes that have taken place among Mennonites with regard to world issues over the course of history. These issues include: urbanization, environmentalism, poverty, mass culture, the communications revolution, the global economy and family life. An emphasis is placed on the Twentieth Century World.
RESTRICTIONS: Students with standing in MENN-3301/3 or HIST-3301/3 may not receive credit for MENN-3116/3 or HIST-3116/3.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3116/3.
MENN-3126/3 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY & THE MENNONITES
This course takes a global perspective on environmental history, especially as it relates to nature and food production. Its focus is on 20th century, a time of immense change in agriculture and horticulture. It considers how new technologies, science, government policies and global markets related to local cultures, especially to religion and ethnicity. While global in nature, the course focuses on specific farm communities around the world. Particular attention is given to ways different kinds of "Mennonite" communities, with their ideas on non-violence and simplicity, related to land and nature.
CROSS-LISTED: HIST-3126(3).
MENN-3128/3 INDIGENOUS-MENNONITE RELATIONS: A HISTORY
This course qualifies for the University of Winnipeg ‘Indigenous Course Requirement.’ It examines the history of the encounters between indigenous societies and the Mennonites, an ethno-religious European settler group. It focuses on specific encounters, mostly in Canada, but also briefly in the Russian Empire and South America (i.e., Paraguay and Bolivia). It considers the process by which Mennonites settled on indigenous territory in the 19th century and the manner in which indigenous peoples experienced that settlement. It also considers how racialized cultural perceptions evolved among the Mennonites, and how throughout the 20th century social relations between community members of Indigenous and Mennonites consisted for both co-operation and conflict. It contrasts the respective Indigenous and Mennonite cosmologies, including ideas on non-violence, social equality, gender relations, racialization and land stewardship. The course considers recent late 20th and early 21st century cross-cultural exchanges, including Indigenous effects on Mennonite organizations, instances of Mennonite advocacy on behalf of Indigenous communities, and persisting relations between the two cultures.
MENN-3150/3 MENNONITE COMMUNITY AND DEVELOPMENT (S3)
This course analyzes the experiences of the Mennonite community in service and peace work. It highlights the values, approach, and methods particular to Mennonite humanitarian work. The Mennonite tradition of holistic development emphasizes individual transformation (providing the tools for indigenous development) and social transformation (involving all peoples in creating local, national, and global systems that are just). The work of Mennonite organizations such as the Mennonite Central Committee and the Mennonite Economic Development Agency, of ecumenical organizations such as the Canadian Foodgrain Bank and InterChurch Action, and of inter-organizational groups such as SEED Winnipeg will provide examples for student reflection and analysis.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100/6 or the permission of instructor.
CROSS-LISTED: International Development Studies IDS-3150/3.
MENN-3201/3 MENNONITE AUTHORS (Le3)
This course introduces the student to the works of Mennonite authors who either write in English or whose writings are available in English translation. Works of the following authors, among others, will be studied: Hans Harder, Arnold Dyck, Fritz Senn, Rudy Wiebe, and contemporary Mennonite poets.
MENN-3202/3 THE MENNONITE IMAGE IN WORLD LITERATURE (Le3)
This course deals with selected German and non-German authors who have treated the Mennonites as a major theme in their fiction. The following authors, among others, will be studied: H.J.C. von Grimmelshausen, Gottfried Keller, Theodor Fontane, Cæsar von Arx, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, and Sandra Birdsell.
MENN-3452/3 ANABAPTISM AND EVANGELICALISM (Le3)
This course will seek to understand both Evangelicalism and Anabaptism in light of recent historiography. Considerable attention will be given to the development of fundamentalism and evangelicalism in the past century in order to provide a basis for understanding the distinctive and common elements of the two traditions.
MENN-3541/3 MENNONITES IN CANADA (Le3)
This course will survey major developments in Canadian Mennonite communities from 1786 to the present. It will trace the following themes: the Swiss American and Russian roots of Canadian Mennonites; community formation in Ontario and Western Canada; Anabaptism in everyday life (especially the way it was played out in the family); theological developments in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the survival of Mennonite faith distinctives in the urban and socially-integrated Canadian society since World War II. Special emphasis will be placed on establishing the unique features of Canadian Mennonite experience.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-3541/3.
MENN-4535/6 IMMIGRATION AND ETHNICITY IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES (S3)
This research seminar examines the history of immigration to North America between 1860 and 1960. The course focuses on the nature of migration patterns and the adaptation of immigrants to the new world, especially the rise of ethnic identities. The course discusses the similarities and differences in the Canadian and American immigrant experience.
CROSS-LISTED: History HIST-4535/6.